Don’t be a brand who never gets feedback from customers in stores

In today's fast-paced world with ever-increasing technological advancements, more and more startups are gravitating towards retails and setting up physical stores in order to reach more customers. According to a TimeTrade study, more than 85% of buyers prefer the brick-and-mortar model over eCommerce, as it allows them to touch and feel the products before making a purchase.

In order to successfully navigate this brand-new chapter of in-store shopping, understanding the wants and needs of your customers through reliable streams of data helps you identify the areas of improvement. Measuring and managing customer feedback in physical stores should be approached with the same candor and care as your other key performance indicators (KPIs) like profitability and revenue.

A Capgemini Consulting report found that 40% of customers found in-store shopping a challenging experience, with reasons ranging from lack of inventory to poor shopper support. The customer journey is always evolving to accommodate more touch points, with the customers treating multiple channels as shortstops on their way to making a purchase. As a brand owner, you're missing out on the valuable opportunity to attract prospective buyers who interact with your brand at the store without buying anything, if you are not collecting customer data and measuring experiences on every step of their journey.

60% of customers in a Cognizant study revealed that they'd be open to taking a short survey or questionnaire in-store, to denote their personal preferences, previous purchases, and products of interest, however, only 39% of retailers have actually approached them for feedback.

With a customer-first outlook, you'd not only be able to optimize both operational excellence and customer experience but also close the significant gap between what the customers want and what you have to offer. Coming from eCommerce, most retailers and brands tend to focus more on keeping up with the digital trends or staying ahead of their competition instead of engaging with their customers. The obvious question of, 'What do customers want?' takes the back burner, in comparison to, 'What do I, as a retailer and a brand, want to provide?'

So, how does one go about collecting customer feedback in physical stores? Setting up 'survey kiosks' is one way to go about it, where you install a touchscreen device with appropriate signage for customers to answer feedback questions on. When placed at right locations, a survey kiosk helps you engage with buyers and non-buyers with just a few taps. You can offer a coupon or a free sample to people who complete the survey to incentivize the process.

With 2.1 billion smartphone users worldwide, the idea of a paperless kiosk equipped with an electronic device sounds better than the traditional feedback form and a pen. To simplify the survey kiosks, some retailers also prefer setting up happy-or-not booths, where the customers can push big, shiny (and more attractive!) emoji buttons to indicate how they feel about their in-store experience.


You don't have to necessarily turn to technology to collect feedback from customers. The good old face-to-face conversation to gauge a customer's interest is a good place to start, too. In fact, the 'baby-boomers generation' prefers in-person interaction unlike 27% of millennials who favor in-store robots for help.

The bottom-line is that listening to people who buy from you and the ones that don't is a business imperative if you want to survive in the uber-competitive retail industry.

Solution Bar (Retail As A Service) initiative makes it easy for Brands to collect customer feedback after every demo. Brands improve their product features, price, messaging to help more customers discover them.

 

 

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